Flood and drought management – video

The FDMT project is funded by the Global Environment Facility (GEF) International Waters (IW) and implemented by UN Environment, with DHI and the International Water Association (IWA) as the executing agencies. The project is developing a package of web-based technical applications (tools) that can be applied individually or together to include information about floods, droughts and future scenarios into planning from the transboundary basin to water utility level.

Visit the Flood and Drought Portal: www.flooddroughtmonitor.com
Find our more: fdmt.iwlearn.org

Motion graphics and illustration: www.chris-wells.com (Chris Wells)
Voice over: www.voices.com (Alexa Brown)

Toolkit for Climate resilient water utility operations

This toolkit provides methodologies for a water utility to develop three documents that are essential to improve its climate resilience: a vulnerability assessment, a climate-resilient business plan, and an emergency response plan.

The U.S. Climate Resilience Toolkit

The U.S. Climate Resilience Toolkit is a website designed to help people find and use tools, information, and subject matter expertise to build climate resilience. The Toolkit offers information from all across the U.S. federal government in one easy-to-use location.

Vulnerability self-assessment tool

Conduct a drinking water or wastewater utility risk assessment: 
Vulnerability Self-Assessment Tool – Web Enabled (VSAT Web) 2.0 – is a user-friendly tool that can help drinking water and wastewater utilities of all sizes to conduct a risk and resilience assessment.

Sewer sludge cleaning and subsequent sludge sediments recycling reuse: A case study in PR China

The treatment and disposal of sludge sediments come from sewer cleaning process is the key for carbon neutrality of the whole system. This means that the sludge sediments should be recycled and beneficial reused rather than directly incineration, landfill or even laissez-faire. nevertheless, besides the environmental impacts of carbon footprint mitigation, relevant co-conflicting issues may include engineering cost, public perception, socio-economic, rules/regulations, and managerial aspects of cleaning process. They all receive excessive consideration from government authorities and stakeholders.

SCADA: Supervisory Control And Data Acquisition

Use of supervisory, control, and data acquisition (SCADA) system for monitoring, supervision and controlling of pumping systems can help minimize energy consumption of GHG emissions. It includes measurements in real time of water levels, pressures, flows, energy consumption and other operational parameters. It also helps to adjust and control the pump station operation, contributing to fight water losses or infiltration, reduce pumping during energy peak hours and adjust pumping volumes to the needs of the system. The SCADA systems provide utility managers with access to real-time operating data and can help offset the higher operating costs by minimizing unplanned downtime and improving maintenance plans. The SCADA system can also be used to optimize pumping in real-time through advanced pump optimization software and control, or through either a model-based or knowledge-based optimization that is implemented via a rule-based system programmed into the SCADA system. This type of optimization entails the use of algorithms to determine the best pumping scheme for a given situation. This can incorporate the peak energy times previously referenced, but also a prioritization of which pumps or pumping stations are used to maximize efficiency whenever possible. For example, if only a certain volume is demanded, then the SCADA system will first operate the most efficient pumps or pumping stations to meet the demand until greater capacity or more pumps are needed.

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