Nature Based Solutions for Wastewater Treatment

This book serves as a compilation of technical references, case examples and guidance for applying nature-based solutions for treatment of domestic wastewater, and enables a wide variety of stakeholders to understand the design parameters, removal efficiencies, costs, co-benefits for both people and nature and trade-offs for consideration in their local context. Examples through case studies are from across the globe and provide practical insights into the variety of potentially applicable solutions.

Adaptation & Resilience – Report following Water Climate Discussion Series Discussion (13 May 2021)

The Water Climate Discussion series is creating a space to come together and help the water sector build its leading role in addressing the climate crisis. The series is the result of close collaboration between water institutions who have come together recognizing climate change as an existential threat and wish to have a voice promoting a key message: water is climate.
This report has been produced based on the discussion lead by Lucien Damiba from WaterAid, Trevor Bishop of WRSE, and the participants’ interaction during the first discussion of the series: Adaptation and Resilience, on Thursday, 13 May 2021. Chapter numbers refer to chapter markers in the video recording of the discussion.

Shaping the water sector to be more climate resilient – A plea for greater and wider collaboration

Celebrating World Water Day 2021 on March 22nd, six experts, backed by five organizations (Stockholm Environment Institute, GIZ, Viva con Agua, WaterWorX and EXP-Consult) present a plea for greater and wider collaboration to shape the water sector to become more climate resilient. Improved management of water and sanitation services is fundamental not only for climate change adaptation but also for mitigation – and collaboration plays a major role in this. The report published under the umbrella of SuSanA describes important guidelines as well as specific approaches and regulatory framework conditions for cross-sectoral collaboration, as well as case studies from around the world. Low-carbon and climate-resilient water and sanitation services are technically feasible and economically viable. Cross-sectoral collaboration is needed, but must be done proportionately, with due consideration of opportunities and risks. With an appropriate regulatory framework in place, this can add important value for the implementation of SDGs and the Paris Agreement.

WaCCliM – Water and Wastewater Companies for Climate Mitigation (Project Video)

Water and wastewater companies are typically energy intensive. This indicates excellent opportunities for improving energy efficiency and greatly reducing greenhouse gas emissions through more energy-efficient systems, as well as recovering energy, nutrients and other materials from wastewater.

The ‘Water and Wastewater Companies for Climate Mitigation’ (WaCCliM) project shows how the urban water sector can reduce its own greenhouse gas emissions while preparing for climate change. WaCCliM engages with the international water and climate community, with national governments and with water and wastewater utilities as well as their associations in Jordan, Mexico and Peru. Together with its national and local partners, WaCCliM is improving the carbon balance of utilities in these countries and beyond. At the same time, the project aims to ensure that utilities increase their climate resilience, reduce their operational costs, and maintain, improve and adapt their services.

Fact Sheet | Strengthening the Water-Energy-Climate Nexus for Green Recovery

Continuous and financially sustainable water and sanitation services are the backbone of resilient economies, particularly during challenging times. In addition to that, the urban water sector can lead the transition towards green recovery through targeted investments, embarking on a pathway towards decarbonization and environmental sustainability. Besides securing continuous drinking water and sanitation for hygiene measures and industrial production, an investment initiative is needed to tap the full potential of combining water, energy and climate action. Implementing low carbon energy projects in the urban water and sanitation sector improves utilities services and financial sustainability, creates green jobs and local business opportunities, protects the climate and environment and increases resilience to face future financial, health and climate crises.

Smart Water Management – 1st Edition

Digital applications to reduce non-revenue water and increase the energy efficiency of water utilities in countries with emerging markets and developing economies

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